Category Archives: Lumineers

How Can I Make My Lumineers Last Longer?

Hi there,

I want a new smile, and am interested in getting porcelain veneers. My cosmetic dentist works with Lumineers, so I was thinking of getting them. However, I want my smile makeover to last a long time. What can I do to make sure my Lumineers last 15-20 years?

Sidney, from Amarillo, TX

 

Hi Sidney,

It is good that your dentist is comfortable working with Lumineers. The first step to making sure your cosmetic dental work lasts a long time is choosing an expert cosmetic dentist. Lumineers are a type of ultra-thin porcelain, but they are placed directly over your natural teeth with no preparation. For this reason, Lumineers can look bulky or unnatural if not placed with skill and care.

You can keep your oral hygiene routine the same at home, as neither tooth brushes, tooth paste, nor mouth wash can harm porcelain. Keep up with your regular dental appointments to prevent gum disease. Also, be sure to let your oral hygienist know you have veneers, to avoid any harsh tools that can leave scratches.

Porcelain may be durable but it can be stained. Coffee and red wine are major culprits, as can be tobacco use. Try to use a straw when drinking coffee or red wine in order to minimize contact with your teeth.

Lumineers can also be ground down like your natural teeth, so make your dentist aware if you grind your teeth. A night guard will take the pressure off your veneers at night, and can prevent any fracturing.

This blog post is brought to you by Phoenix  Dentist, Dr. Hillary Peck, of Peck Family Dentistry.

 

Lumineers Disaster

I went into my dentist for a smile makeover. He gave me four Lumineers. When I went there, I was very specific with him that I wanted a white smile. Yet, when my Lumineers came in and were placed, I noticed they weren’t white like we’d discussed. I tried to like them, but after a few days, I called him. I expressed that I didn’t like the color. That’s when he told me he placed a stain on them so they’d look “normal”. I was quite disappointed to hear that as it went against my expressed desires. He offered to take the stain off. That idea thrilled me. I went there with high hopes. Those hopes were dashed when I saw the results. Essentially, all he did was drill off the top layer. This made the teeth look dull and uneven, which is even worse. Do I have any way of affordably getting this fixed?

Brandon.

Dear Brandon,

A porcelain veneer being placed on a tooth

The smile makeover procedure you had reminds me a little to much of the middle-grade books, A Series of Unfortunate Events. I can tell from the way you described things that your dentist is either fairly new at cosmetic dentistry and is dipping his toes in the smile makeover waters, or he’s just completely incompetent. Because Lumineers is highly marketed to inexperienced cosmetic dentists as being easier to place than other brands of porcelain veneers, I suspect (or maybe hope) it is the former.

Let’s start with the fact that he did four Lumineers. Most people’s smiles are around eight to ten teeth wide. If you don’t want a bi-color smile, you have two choices. First, you can get that many porcelain veneers. A great option if you can afford it. However, not everyone can. In that case, your second option is to have your teeth whitened before you have your veneers made. This way the teeth will be close enough in color to make sense and blend.

The next disastrous decision is he stained them. Yes, you said you wanted a white smile, but your dentist thought, “I’m the professional and know better.” So, he put a stain on them to make them look like regular teeth. This is an attitude taught in general dental school. However, people paying for a new smile don’t want “regular” teeth. They want gorgeous teeth. This is why dentists who invest in post-doctoral training in smile makeovers learn the opposite. You aren’t creating normal smiles. Instead, you are creating your patient’s dream smile.

Amateur move number three is him bonding them on without you getting a look at them. True cosmetic dentists will use a temporary try-in paste, give you plenty of time to look at the veneers in various lightings, and decide if you are thrilled with them. If you’re not, they don’t get bonded on. The dentist will make the changes necessary to achieve the results you want. You’re paying for a stunning smile. You should get one.

His Disastrous Lumineers “Fix”

Finally, let’s get into your dentist’s “fix” for his misjudgment. What he should have done when you told him this wasn’t the color you agreed to was to start over and provide you with new Lumineers. That, however, would cost him time and money. So, he takes a short cut and drills off the stain. While this ruined your Lumineers, this is actually good news for you.

Because he damaged them, he is now obligated to fix them. I would not just get a refund or have him re-do them. He’s shown a disregard for your wishes, as well as a lack of commitment to the quality of his work. What you need to do is tell him you would like him to cover the cost of another dentist replacing them.

Before deciding on a second dentist, look at their smile gallery. Make sure there are before and after pictures of cases they’ve done personally, not just stock photos. Even then, only go forward if you absolutely love the after results they acheived.

This blog is brought to you by Phoenix Dentist Dr. Hillary Peck.

Pros and Cons to Lumineers

Hi,

I am interested in getting Lumineers. Should I? Or would I be better off getting something else instead?

Jodie, from Chicago, Illinois

 

Hi Jodie,

Lumineers are a brand of ultra-thin porcelain veneers. They can easily fix minor dental flaws by being cemented over your natural tooth.

This article will highlight the pros and cons of whether Lumineers are right for you. Be sure to talk over your options with your dentist prior to getting any cosmetic dental work.

Pros of Lumineers

One major reason Lumineers are popular is because they are a no-prep veneer, meaning your tooth’s surface does not need preparing or roughening before the Lumineer is cemented in. Due to the lack of prep, Lumineers are a conservative option for a smile makeover.

Veneers are a good option if you suffer from teeth that are crooked, cracked, discolored, or came in incorrectly. Porcelain veneers can easily fix these problems.

If your smile is in need of a whitening boost but you’re tired of whitening your teeth, or needs to be evened out, porcelain veneers are a non-invasive option for a smile makeover.

Cons of Lumineers

For extensive, restorative dental work, porcelain veneers may not be the best option.

Another thing to be careful of is the dentist placing your Lumineers. Due to the no-prep nature of the procedure, Lumineers are placed over your natural teeth. In the wrong the hands, Lumineers can appear bulky if placed by an inexperienced cosmetic dentist.

If you want your Lumineers to look like the marketing materials, be sure to check a potential dentist’s smile gallery before agreeing to any work. If you find a dentist you want to work with who is not comfortable working with Lumineers, you may want to opt for a different material for your smile makeover.

This blog post is brought to you by Phoenix Lumineers provider, Dr. Hillary Peck, of Peck Family Dentistry.

 

Should I Seek a Second Opinion on my Porcelain Veneers?

Hello there,

I was interested in getting a dentist to do a smile makeover over some of my upper teeth. Initially I considered braces or orthodontic treatment, because my teeth were not aligned and there was some crowding. My dentist encouraged me to consider porcelain veneers instead, as they could fix my teeth’s problems much faster than orthodontics.

He examined my teeth, and quoted me an amount that included shaving and shaping my teeth,  as well as the porcelain work. It was nearly $10,000! After I got over the sticker shock, he said that price did not include any root canals, which I would also need.

Should I get a second opinion from another cosmetic dentist? Or is this a normal price everywhere?  Should I get Lumineers instead to make the price cheaper? I knew cosmetic work would be expensive, but I need something more affordable than $10,000!

Luna, from Tonawanda, New York

 

Hi Luna,

The art of the smile makeover is not taught in dental school. Dentists are taught to be pragmatic and functional, to fix problems rather than create artistic solutions. Granted, the higher the sticker price does not always mean the best quality. A lot of research should go into selecting a cosmetic dentist for a smile makeover.

Lumineers are sometimes cheaper because they do not require prep, such as shaping or shaving. However, Lumineers take a special amount of skill to place; in the wrong hands, they can look bulky. If your dentist is not comfortable with Lumineers, do not push them. You may save a few dollars, but if the dentist is working outside their comfort zone, the resulting work may not be the highest quality.

You may be better off looking at smile galleries on local cosmetic dentists’ web pages to find someone you like. The final result is more important than price, and getting work done correctly the first time will save you money in the long run.

This blog post is brought to you by Phoenix Lumineers provider, Dr. Hillary Peck, of Peck Family Dentistry.

Should I Get Lumineers?

Hello,

I’ve always hated my smile, and am interested in getting veneers to fix it. I’m interested in Lumineers, but I’ve heard they may not be as durable as porcelain veneers. Which would be better? I’m currently saving up for the veneers, so cost is a factor. I want the longest-lasting veneers I can get.

Sydnee, from Richmond, VA

Hi Sydnee,

Lumineers are a brand of porcelain veneer, and porcelain in general is very strong. If a veneer cracks, it’s likely because of poor bonding, rather than the material itself.

Lumineers are thinner than your usual porcelain veneer, but require a skilled dentist to make and place. In the wrong hands, they can look fake. Since they are a no-prep veneer, they can also look bulky if not bonded properly. Be sure to check your cosmetic dentist’s smile gallery first, to see if you like the look of Lumineers.

Before and after photos of smile makeovers are a good way to gauge a potential cosmetic dentist’s skill. Most dentists like their work because they get to fix problems, rather than create beautiful pieces of art. A true cosmetic dentist can combine aesthetics with functionality.

Some cosmetic dentists do not do Lumineers. Apart from requiring high levels of skill to place, they also require a special lab for processing, so some dentists opt not to work with them.  If you go to a cosmetic dentist who does not do Lumineers, it’s best not to press the issue; pushing a dentist to work with a material outside their comfort zone can have disastrous results for your smile.

This blog post is brought to you by Phoenix Lumineers provider, Dr. Hillary Peck. Dr. Peck is a general dentist with years of training in cosmetic dentistry and experience placing Lumineers.

Are Lumineers Cheaper than Porcelain Veneers?

Hi,

I’m interested in a smile makeover with veneers. Where I live, porcelain veneers are over $1,500 per tooth. However, I’ve heard Lumineers cost a bit less. Is this true? Should I look for a cosmetic dentist to place Lumineers, or just get regular porcelain veneers? Can I get a beautiful smile with Lumineers for less than $1,500?

Miki, from Minneapolis, Minnesota

 

Hi Miki,

One of the most important things to look for in a cosmetic dentist is artistry, not cost. That may sound counter-intuitive, but the cheaper the dentist, the less quality work you receive. When you pay for cosmetic dentistry, you’re paying for the training, education, and mastery of the dentist. When getting Lumineers, expertise is key because when placed by an inexperienced dentist, they can look bulky.

A general dentist may agree to place your Lumineers or veneers, but a general dentist is trained to fix problems, not create an aesthetic smile. A cosmetic dentist will go the extra mile to create a smile you’re proud of. Saving money by opting for Lumineers isn’t going to be worth it if the colors don’t match and you’re too shy to show them off.

It’s always best to approach cosmetic dentistry with an open mind. Check a dentist’s smile gallery, and see if their work is the kind that you’d like for yourself. If you find you still want Lumineers, look for a dentist experienced with them, as the no-prep placement requires skill. Call a few cosmetic dental offices in your area to compare prices, and you’ll have a better idea of the total cost of your procedure.

This blog post is brought to you by Phoenix Lumineers provider Dr. Hillary Peck. Dr. Peck is a licensed general dentist with years of experience in placing Lumineers.

 

 

Can I Place New Lumineers Over My Old Ones?

Hi,

I got Lumineers placed on my teeth years ago, and they are not as white as I’d like them to be. I know that porcelain crowns can’t be whitened with tooth whitening or bleaching, but I was wondering about something else I could do. Is it possible to place new, whiter Lumineers over my old ones? Is it recommended? I just want my smile to be brighter.

Thank you,

Julia, from Accident, Maryland.

 

Hi Julia,

Lumineers are an ultra-thin type of porcelain veneer marketed as a no-prep procedure, meaning they are bonded directly to your tooth without any surface preparation. Your dentist should have taken your smile concerns into consideration while making your Lumineers. Not getting the color you wanted is probably a result of your dentist lacking experience in cosmetic dentistry. A true cosmetic dentist would take your aesthetic concerns as seriously as your practical ones.

Fortunately, you can get a brighter smile if you re-do your old Lumineers. Putting new ones over your current ones will not save you any time or money, and may also feel too thick when placed in your mouth. Bonding Lumineers on top of existing ones or porcelain veneer increases the risk of failure. Also, the thin margin between where the Lumineers meet would be more prone to staining than if it were placed over a natural tooth.

So to improve the whiteness and look of your smile, you should seek out a cosmetic dentist to replace your Lumineers. Cosmetic dentistry isn’t a specialty recognized by the ADA, but some dentists have received extensive post-graduate training in cosmetic and restorative dentistry, and have the experience to help your case.

Also, be open minded when seeking a new dentist for your Lumineers – not all dentists are comfortable using them, and you may find that a different type of porcelain veneer is best for you.

This blog post is brought to you by Phoenix Lumineers provider, Dr. Hillary Peck. Dr. Peck is a general dentist who has considerable experience with cosmetic and restorative dentistry.

Should I Get Lumineers?

Hi,

I’m writing to you because I have several chipped teeth I’d like to take care of.  They were covered with bonding material, but over the years it has worn down. I’m interested in a more permanent solution, such as  porcelain veneers to cover my teeth. I’m not sure about what type of porcelain veneer to get, and am interested in Lumineers because of their convenience. How should I go about finding a dentist to do my veneers? Do I need to go to a dentist especially for Lumineers?

Thank you,
Emi, Boston, Massachusetts

Hi Emi,

Thank you for your question. Lumineers are made from cerinate porcelain and are thinner than regular veneers. They can be bonded with no tooth preparation (roughing the tooth’s surface) so there is less discomfort and fewer visits required.

However, not every dentist is skilled at placing Lumineers. You should look for someone who has experience and education directly related to Lumineers. Pushing a dentist outside their comfort zone will not give you a good result.

Secondly, check the smile gallery of your prospective dentist. Make sure they have samples of Lumineers for you to see. Since Lumineers are placed over your existing tooth, they can appear bulky or thicker than natural teeth.

Still, finding a cosmetic dentist comfortable with placing Lumineers is the key to getting the best result with Lumineers. For example, at Dr. Hillary Peck’s Phoenix office, she will consult with patients to see if they are a good candidate for Lumineers. If Lumineers are not the best fit for you esthetically, a different brand of porcelain veneer will be suggested. A good cosmetic dentist will consider the patient’s smile design goals and esthetic concerns and not shoehorn in a one-size-fits-all solution. A cosmetic dentist will know whether Lumineers are the best solution for you.

I hope this helps. Good luck in your search. In your area, you should be able to find a good cosmetic dentist to help you.

This blog post is brought to you by Phoenix cosmetic dentist, Dr Hillary Peck, of Peck Family Dentistry.

Difference between lumineers and veneers

My two front teeth are badly messed up. One is too thin and misshapen, and the other is badly chipped. I know I have to do something.

Lumineers and porcelain veneers are both options I am considering. I visited a cosmetic dentist who suggested veneers, since my teeth are so badly damaged. However, I’m wondering which is the most durable option.

The procedure will take almost every penny I have to my name, so I want to be very confident in the choice I go with.

Can you advise me on the two options, and let me know which is the best route to go?

Thank you,
Emily

Emily,
It’s important to understand the relationship between Lumineers and porcelain veneers. Lumineers are a brand of porcelain veneers, just like Ford and Honda are brands of cars.

The brand of veneers used by a dentist varies, as does the skill level of dentists who are veneer providers. There are dentists who are incredibly talented when it comes to procedures like this and attract a clientele including models, actors and actresses, and patients will fly across the country for their artistry. While there are other dentists who pay no attention to the appearance or beauty of a new smile, and focus only on the technicality of the procedures.

Considerations When Looking for a Lumineer Provider

Many dentists selected this profession because of their interest in fixing things, improving things, operating. Not all dentists further their education beyond these aspects. Therefore, not all dentists who perform cosmetic dentistry are cosmetic dentists.

One of the first steps is selecting an experienced cosmetic dentist. Because cosmetic dentistry is not recognized as a specialty endorsed by the American Dental Association, any dentist can claim to be a cosmetic dentist. Expert cosmetic dentists have education which extends beyond that taught in a dental program. They participate in continuing education hours which provide further training, and they have in-depth experience in many cosmetic dentistry procedures.

Also pay attention to the reviews left by other dental patients, as well as the dentist’s smile gallery. A dentist’s gallery displays photos of before and after shots. Pay particular attention to those which have Lumineers or porcelain veneers. Look for traits in the smiles that you are hopeful to eventually see in yourself.

Also consider talking with the dentist. Many dentists offer a complimentary consultation, during which the patient is given a brief amount of time to ask questions. This will give you an opportunity to determine the dentist’s opinion on Lumineers, and porcelain veneers in general.

It’s important to put more emphasis on selecting the right dentist. Then, he or she will help you determine what the right fit is for your veneers.

Good luck!

This article was brought to you by the office of Phoenix Lumineer provider, Dr. Hillary Peck.

Are lumineers a good option for your teeth?

Many dental professionals have differing opinions regarding Lumineers. Below is a breakdown of information to aid you in determining if they are the best dental option for you.

How do Lumineers work?

Just like Nike is a brand of shoes and Pepsi is a brand of soda, Lumineers is a brand of veneers. And, just like Pepsi and Nike, there are other brands of incredibly thin veneers, as well as unbranded options.

Ultra-thin veneers improve smiles in many ways

  • More vivid and uniform tooth coloring
  • Repair chips
  • Close gaps
  • Creates a celebrity-like smile

No-prep or low-prep option
Porcelain veneers are traditionally used to create a celebrity-like smile. In these veneers, a porcelain layer is applied to the front of the tooth, and around the sides and biting surface. A small portion of the tooth’s structure will need to be removed anywhere where the porcelain is, in order for the shell to fit naturally and create a uniform look. If a tooth is unstraight, or sticks out further than its neighbor teeth, more of the tooth’s structure may be taken off, in order for it to look straight once the veneer is on. Not all patients need such changes though, and for these cases, the ultrathin option is ideal. The are approximately as thick as a fingernail, and some of the brands claim that no prepping or removing of the tooth’s structure is necessary with the veneer be placed on top. However, this is rarely the case, as additional bulk is created, as well as an unnatural look, resulting in unhappy patients. Therefore, dentists tend to use the ultra-thin veneers as a low-prep alternative.

Do Lumineers harm your teeth?

Whether it be traditional, low-prep, or no-prep option, placing veneers will permanently alter the structure of a tooth. Even the no-prep alternative roughens the surface of the tooth to allow the veneer shell to adhere. Because the change to the tooth is permanent with any of these options, there will always need to be a covering on that tooth.

Ultra-thin veneers are a safe option

The ultra-thin veneers are an approach that is minimally invasive, yet can yield significant results. They are the effective choice when a smile makeover is desired, but teeth are not in need of extensive alterations. However, they are not always the most appropriate option for every scenario. For some people that are not a candidate for the ultra-thin option, the traditional porcelain veneers are a good alternative. A small amount of enamel is removed in both situations.

This article is brought to you by Phoenix Lumineer dentist, Dr. Hillary Peck.